Deviled egg fillings ready to pipe into the eggs.

When I was growing up, I could take or leave deviled eggs. They were usually made with a little too much mayonnaise, just a whisper of paprika, and not enough salt. Then I tried chef April Bloomfield’s version at her New York City restaurant, The Spotted Pig, where the eggs are luscious and punchy at the same time, and I became a convert.

In my forthcoming book, Modern Potluck, I devote a section to deviled eggs along with four recipes for different fillings, including my favorite, the Bloody Mary Deviled Egg (see the filling on the left).

Transporting deviled eggs seems tricky, but it doesn’t have to be. Here, some tips:

  1. For the minimalist cook: Set the assembled eggs in the cups of a muffin tin or in ice cube trays and cover them loosely with plastic. This option is best if you’re not concerned about perfection, you’re not going far, and you plan to eat the eggs as soon as you get to the party.
  2. For the deviled egg obsessive: If you’re the one who always buy real modafinil bring the eggs, it might be worth spending the $10 to $20 for a deviled egg carrier, which you can repurpose to hold kitchen odds and ends when it’s not in use.
  3. For the perfectionist foodie: Bring the egg whites in an airtight container (you can stack them) and the filling in a resealable plastic bag or a piping bag (see above). At the party, arrange the eggs whites on a platter, snip off one of the bag corners, and use that bag to pipe the filling into the egg cavities. Or you can do like I did last year after the book photo shoot and bring the four fillings in bags, set out the whites separately and let people pipe in the filling themselves (or even mix and match!).